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Mimi
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Re: movies

Post by Mimi » 11 Sep 2019, 8:40am

Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Sep 2019, 8:30am
Mimi wrote:
11 Sep 2019, 8:04am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Sep 2019, 1:48pm
Kory wrote:
10 Sep 2019, 12:55pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Sep 2019, 8:04pm


I'll say that he was good on Freaks and Geeks and Undeclared, but, well, that was twenty years ago.
You're thinking of Seth Rogen, I think.
Oh, shit, I totally misread the spelling. But it's telling that I could see Seth Rogen being just as much a dipshit.
That's who I thought yinz were talking about.
I love that you use that regionalism. I can almost see the coal dust on your face. :smile:
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Re: movies

Post by matedog » 11 Sep 2019, 10:15am

Seth Rogen is generally likable. Jonah Hill always irks me though, eventhough he has done unchallenging "serious" roles and people seem to respect him now.
Look, you have to establish context for these things. And I maintain that unless you appreciate the Fall of Constantinople, the Great Fire of London, and Mickey Mantle's fatalist alcoholism, live Freddy makes no sense. If you want to half-ass it, fine, go call Simon Schama to do the appendix.

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Re: movies

Post by JennyB » 11 Sep 2019, 11:00am

matedog wrote:
11 Sep 2019, 10:15am
Seth Rogen is generally likable. Jonah Hill always irks me though, eventhough he has done unchallenging "serious" roles and people seem to respect him now.
I agree with this post. I like Seth Rogen. Jonah Hill is one of my many nemesis's.
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Re: movies

Post by BostonBeaneater » 11 Sep 2019, 11:07pm

JennyB wrote:
11 Sep 2019, 11:00am
matedog wrote:
11 Sep 2019, 10:15am
Seth Rogen is generally likable. Jonah Hill always irks me though, eventhough he has done unchallenging "serious" roles and people seem to respect him now.
I agree with this post. I like Seth Rogen. Jonah Hill is one of my many nemesis's.
Jonah Hill seems like a miserable douchebag.
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tepista
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Re: movies

Post by tepista » 13 Sep 2019, 7:33pm

Ready or Not (2019) A bride (Samara Weaving) who marries into a rich family finds herself in a wedding tradition game of Hide & Seek, and soon finds the stakes are life and death. Loads of fun and violence from a team of directors who had segments in VHS and Southbound. (Also the awful Devil’s Due, but we’ll give them a pass on that one) Entertaining all the way through.

The Falling aka Alien Predator (1986) An experimental satellite crash lands in Spain and gives space-rabies to cows and humans, but instead of focusing on the crazy-violent population of the village, we get stuck with three American tourists in an RV worrying about which dude the blond is going to make out with. Some gore, but this was a major dud. Director Deran Sarafian would find his niche as a TV director/producer, where he’s worked steady for decades now.

Dawn of the Dead (1977) As a teenage gorehound, this was the one that we put on a pedestal. George A Romero's sequel to his classic Night of the Living Dead, in which he re-defined the modern flesh-eating zombie, sees the zombie apocalypse now in full effect. Two TV newspeople and two SWAT team members steal the weather-copter and search for somewhere to survive. They ultimately land in a Pittsburgh indoor shopping mall, where they have food, luxuries and a safe distance from the flesheaters. That is until another band of survivors wants in. Special effects legend Tom Savini makes the bloodiest and goriest scenes ever up to this point. Even at 2 hours+, it gets the job done without ever dragging. Dario Argento and Goblin do the synth-heavy soundtrack, and Dario also served as script consultant, while brother Claudio was a producer. Released as "Zombi" in Italy, which answers the million times asked question, "If Lucio Fulici's movie is Zombie 2, then what happened to Zombie 1?"

Deathdream aka Dead of Night (1974) A Vietnam vet is reported dead, but shows up on his family’s doorstep the next day. His personality has changed though, not the least bit being he needs human blood to keep his flesh from rotting! John Marley (The Godfather) plays the father who wrestles with the fact that his son might be a murderer. This was my personal holy grail for decades, as I had read a great review in a book in the early 80s, and I wasn’t able to find it on home video until the early 2000s! It was worth the wait. Director Bob Clark’s next film would be Black Christmas. Tom Savini on the make-up FX.

The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot (2018) With a title like that I was hoping for some wild and zany action, nothing of the sort. An old man (Sam Elliot) flashes back to the decisions he made as a young man (not Sam Elliiot), which included killing Hitler. Despite his advanced years, the military approaches him to take out a plague-carrying Sasquatch. The bigfoot sequence was pretty cool. Much to my surprise, when the end credits rolled I found that the great Lucky McKee had a producer credit.

Hannah, Queen of the Vampires aka Crypt of the Living Dead (1973) A young man (Andrew Prine) visits an island to bury his father, an archeologist who managed to get crushed to death under a 3 ton tomb. Much to the locals dismay, he disassembles the tomb to get his father’s body out, and releases the beautiful Hannah, a 700 year old vampire who kills a bunch of islanders, mostly in the form of a wolf.

Howl (2015) A midnight train in England gets stranded on the tracks in the woods, and the passengers fall prey to a werewolf. It’s as simple as that. Your typical mismatch of characters include train employee who likes the girl, bigmouth jerk, old couple, snotty young girl, etc. They must work together because help is not on the way. I enjoyed the shit out of this just as much the second time around.

Byzantium (2012) Two vampire “sisters” make ends meet for the last 200 years as the old one turns tricks to support and protect the younger one. Their back story is slowly revealed through storytelling and flashbacks. Directed by Neil Jordan (The Crying Game, Interview with a Vampire). Gemma Atrerton was a pleasure to look at as the older of the two, and Caleb Landry Jones was in it too (not as much a pleasure to look at, but I like him). I liked this a lot.
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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla » 13 Sep 2019, 7:36pm

tepista wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:33pm
The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot (2018) With a title like that I was hoping for some wild and zany action, nothing of the sort. An old man (Sam Elliot) flashes back to the decisions he made as a young man (not Sam Elliiot), which included killing Hitler. Despite his advanced years, the military approaches him to take out a plague-carrying Sasquatch. The bigfoot sequence was pretty cool. Much to my surprise, when the end credits rolled I found that the great Lucky McKee had a producer credit.
A movie with that title and failed to deliver would break my heart in 29 places. I'd also want to kick in the nuts everyone involved.
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tepista
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Re: movies

Post by tepista » 13 Sep 2019, 10:07pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:36pm
tepista wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:33pm
The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot (2018) With a title like that I was hoping for some wild and zany action, nothing of the sort. An old man (Sam Elliot) flashes back to the decisions he made as a young man (not Sam Elliiot), which included killing Hitler. Despite his advanced years, the military approaches him to take out a plague-carrying Sasquatch. The bigfoot sequence was pretty cool. Much to my surprise, when the end credits rolled I found that the great Lucky McKee had a producer credit.
A movie with that title and failed to deliver would break my heart in 29 places. I'd also want to kick in the nuts everyone involved.
I was expecting it to be more like FDR: American Badass
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1811315/
We reach the parts other combos cannot reach
We beach the beachheads other armies cannot beach
We speak the tongues other mouths cannot speak

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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla » 14 Sep 2019, 2:35am

tepista wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 10:07pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:36pm
tepista wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:33pm
The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot (2018) With a title like that I was hoping for some wild and zany action, nothing of the sort. An old man (Sam Elliot) flashes back to the decisions he made as a young man (not Sam Elliiot), which included killing Hitler. Despite his advanced years, the military approaches him to take out a plague-carrying Sasquatch. The bigfoot sequence was pretty cool. Much to my surprise, when the end credits rolled I found that the great Lucky McKee had a producer credit.
A movie with that title and failed to deliver would break my heart in 29 places. I'd also want to kick in the nuts everyone involved.
I was expecting it to be more like FDR: American Badass
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1811315/
I've got that flick. So damned much fun.
Poonty, boloques, juffmunch, carpoo, snazellfonks.

Mimi
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Re: movies

Post by Mimi » 20 Sep 2019, 9:29pm

Downton Abbey. :kiss:

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Re: movies

Post by Kory » 23 Sep 2019, 1:43pm

Saw Ad Astra this weekend. It was fine but forgettable. The space setting really could have been anything.
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Re: movies

Post by tepista » 27 Sep 2019, 7:24pm

Frostbitten (2006) Apparently, this was the first ever vampire movie from Sweden. We all know the second! A mother moves her teen daughter to a small Scandinavian town where the sun goes down for a month to take a job in a hospital. A doctor there has his own personal patient, which we find out is a vampire that he keeps in a coma to perform blood experiments on, and for whatever reason, make caplets of vampire blood. A string of incidents has a whole bottle of these pills ending up at a high school drinking party and misidentified as recreational drugs! All hell breaks loose, as you might imagine. This movie was funny and exciting with very likeable characters. The first time I saw this I flipped out over it, not as spectacular as I remembered, but still very good.

Nosferatu (1922) F.W. Murnau’s classic, unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. A hideous vampire secures passage from Transylvania with the help of a real estate agent and brings plague and death to a German village. What else can you say about this masterpiece? The use of shadows is expert level for such an early film.

Stripped to Kill 2: Live Girls (1989) A stripper gets her throat slashed with a razor. A cop starts hanging around the club and falls for one of the girls, but soon starts to believe that she may be the killer. A lot of nudity, and all the girls were pretty, yet this still managed to be tedious, not an easy task. It seemed like forever before a second girl got killed. And we didn’t need Sherlock Holmes to figure out the real killer. Roger Corman executive produced.

Tigers are not Afraid (2017) Orphan kids on the streets of Mexico protect themselves against the drug cartel that killed their parents. If you like movies where a bunch of happy kids ride bikes and fight clowns or other stranger type things, this certainly ain’t that. Very dark and depressing. There was a bit of a magic/fantasy aspect to it, as the main girl’s decisions were influenced by fairies, ghosts, stuffed animals, etc. Very Del Toro-esque. Only a few ticks over 80 minutes.

Halloween (2018) Ignoring the countless sequels and reboots, Jamie Lee Curtis returns as Laurie Strode, who has been living in constant fear for the last 40 years or so, and now lives in a bunker with a military arsenal. Micheal Myers gets out, of course and goes on a rampage, putting Laurie’s estranged family, and numerous others, at risk. I loved this in the theater, but it seemed to have lost a bit on my second watch at home. Still a very fun slasher, and probably one of the better Halloween entries (there were a bunch of stinkers in there).

First House on the Hill (2017) I don’t know how I came upon this one, and even harder to explain would be how I sat through the whole thing. Churchy girl rents a vacation house with her friends and finds out that they’re into Tarot cards! Dull characters with zero chemistry, dull plot, and if the whole movie wasn’t awkward to begin with, they managed to stick an “intermission” in an 82 minute movie! The main girl looked like Sarah Silverman.

Brightburn (2019) Two farmers (one of them is Liz Banks) in Brightburn, Kansas find a space-baby and raise him as their own. When he turns 12, he realizes he has super powers and uses them to kill a shitload of people. So basically it’s a retelling of Superman, but instead of using his powers for good, he has a really, really hot mom. He also loves to write the bluetooth symbol all over the place. Produced by James Gunn. I didn’t like the title, but I guess it’s a play on Smallville?
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Dr. Medulla
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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla » 27 Sep 2019, 7:32pm

tepista wrote:
27 Sep 2019, 7:24pm
Nosferatu (1922) F.W. Murnau’s classic, unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. A hideous vampire secures passage from Transylvania with the help of a real estate agent and brings plague and death to a German village. What else can you say about this masterpiece? The use of shadows is expert level for such an early film.
Use Purplebricks, keep the vampires in their coffins.
Poonty, boloques, juffmunch, carpoo, snazellfonks.

tepista
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Re: movies

Post by tepista » 27 Sep 2019, 7:40pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
27 Sep 2019, 7:32pm
tepista wrote:
27 Sep 2019, 7:24pm
Nosferatu (1922) F.W. Murnau’s classic, unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. A hideous vampire secures passage from Transylvania with the help of a real estate agent and brings plague and death to a German village. What else can you say about this masterpiece? The use of shadows is expert level for such an early film.
Use Purplebricks, keep the vampires in their coffins.
HA!, nice.
We reach the parts other combos cannot reach
We beach the beachheads other armies cannot beach
We speak the tongues other mouths cannot speak

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Re: movies

Post by 101Walterton » 27 Sep 2019, 9:17pm

tepista wrote:
13 Sep 2019, 7:33pm
Ready or Not (2019) A bride (Samara Weaving) who marries into a rich family finds herself in a wedding tradition game of Hide & Seek, and soon finds the stakes are life and death. Loads of fun and violence from a team of directors who had segments in VHS and Southbound. (Also the awful Devil’s Due, but we’ll give them a pass on that one) Entertaining all the way through.

The Falling aka Alien Predator (1986) An experimental satellite crash lands in Spain and gives space-rabies to cows and humans, but instead of focusing on the crazy-violent population of the village, we get stuck with three American tourists in an RV worrying about which dude the blond is going to make out with. Some gore, but this was a major dud. Director Deran Sarafian would find his niche as a TV director/producer, where he’s worked steady for decades now.

Dawn of the Dead (1977) As a teenage gorehound, this was the one that we put on a pedestal. George A Romero's sequel to his classic Night of the Living Dead, in which he re-defined the modern flesh-eating zombie, sees the zombie apocalypse now in full effect. Two TV newspeople and two SWAT team members steal the weather-copter and search for somewhere to survive. They ultimately land in a Pittsburgh indoor shopping mall, where they have food, luxuries and a safe distance from the flesheaters. That is until another band of survivors wants in. Special effects legend Tom Savini makes the bloodiest and goriest scenes ever up to this point. Even at 2 hours+, it gets the job done without ever dragging. Dario Argento and Goblin do the synth-heavy soundtrack, and Dario also served as script consultant, while brother Claudio was a producer. Released as "Zombi" in Italy, which answers the million times asked question, "If Lucio Fulici's movie is Zombie 2, then what happened to Zombie 1?"

Deathdream aka Dead of Night (1974) A Vietnam vet is reported dead, but shows up on his family’s doorstep the next day. His personality has changed though, not the least bit being he needs human blood to keep his flesh from rotting! John Marley (The Godfather) plays the father who wrestles with the fact that his son might be a murderer. This was my personal holy grail for decades, as I had read a great review in a book in the early 80s, and I wasn’t able to find it on home video until the early 2000s! It was worth the wait. Director Bob Clark’s next film would be Black Christmas. Tom Savini on the make-up FX.

The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot (2018) With a title like that I was hoping for some wild and zany action, nothing of the sort. An old man (Sam Elliot) flashes back to the decisions he made as a young man (not Sam Elliiot), which included killing Hitler. Despite his advanced years, the military approaches him to take out a plague-carrying Sasquatch. The bigfoot sequence was pretty cool. Much to my surprise, when the end credits rolled I found that the great Lucky McKee had a producer credit.

Hannah, Queen of the Vampires aka Crypt of the Living Dead (1973) A young man (Andrew Prine) visits an island to bury his father, an archeologist who managed to get crushed to death under a 3 ton tomb. Much to the locals dismay, he disassembles the tomb to get his father’s body out, and releases the beautiful Hannah, a 700 year old vampire who kills a bunch of islanders, mostly in the form of a wolf.

Howl (2015) A midnight train in England gets stranded on the tracks in the woods, and the passengers fall prey to a werewolf. It’s as simple as that. Your typical mismatch of characters include train employee who likes the girl, bigmouth jerk, old couple, snotty young girl, etc. They must work together because help is not on the way. I enjoyed the shit out of this just as much the second time around.

Byzantium (2012) Two vampire “sisters” make ends meet for the last 200 years as the old one turns tricks to support and protect the younger one. Their back story is slowly revealed through storytelling and flashbacks. Directed by Neil Jordan (The Crying Game, Interview with a Vampire). Gemma Atrerton was a pleasure to look at as the older of the two, and Caleb Landry Jones was in it too (not as much a pleasure to look at, but I like him). I liked this a lot.
Where do you watch all these films and more to the point where do you find the time? That’s probably more films than I have watched in the last 5 years!

tepista
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Re: movies

Post by tepista » 27 Sep 2019, 9:29pm

Well I got no kids so I do have a lot of time to myself. I have a few movie subscription services, and the more obscure ones monkey helps me steal them off the internet. I watch at least 5 hours of TV a day!
We reach the parts other combos cannot reach
We beach the beachheads other armies cannot beach
We speak the tongues other mouths cannot speak

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