A Language Question For The Linguists

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matedog
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by matedog » 21 Jun 2017, 2:16pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
21 Jun 2017, 8:04am
Fun quiz that demonstrates what a dog's breakfast the English language is: https://www.sporcle.com/games/snewms/sp ... le-sparcle
Got them well, though one I was going to add an "ed" at the end and it said I was right before I had the chance to add the ed. Also had to ignore my Soundgarden knowledge for outshine.
Look, you have to establish context for these things. And I maintain that unless you appreciate the Fall of Constantinople, the Great Fire of London, and Mickey Mantle's fatalist alcoholism, live Freddy makes no sense. If you want to half-ass it, fine, go call Simon Schama to do the appendix.

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Low Down Low » 21 Jun 2017, 2:32pm

32/32 in 28 secs. Not bragging, it was a bit easy. Forgo made me think a second whether to put the "e" in.

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Dr. Medulla » 25 Jul 2017, 7:21pm

Question for non-Canadians: Do you use the term mud room for the part of the house where you take off your shoes, hang up your coats, etc? I'm mildly curious whether this is a fairly common term.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Boddington » 25 Jul 2017, 7:43pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Jul 2017, 7:21pm
Question for non-Canadians: Do you use the term mud room for the part of the house where you take off your shoes, hang up your coats, etc? I'm mildly curious whether this is a fairly common term.
I think it's somewhat of a Northeast thing maybe? I've heard it referred to as such in New England on occasion. Sometimes it's also where the washer and dryer will be located.

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Kory » 25 Jul 2017, 7:53pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Jul 2017, 7:21pm
Question for non-Canadians: Do you use the term mud room for the part of the house where you take off your shoes, hang up your coats, etc? I'm mildly curious whether this is a fairly common term.
I often call it the foyer, but I think I'm alone in that. Most people around here just call it "by the door."
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Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by revbob » 25 Jul 2017, 9:27pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Jul 2017, 7:21pm
Question for non-Canadians: Do you use the term mud room for the part of the house where you take off your shoes, hang up your coats, etc? I'm mildly curious whether this is a fairly common term.
Definitely a term that is widely used in Vermont. We also have a Mud Season, which is basically post thaw winter when it really isn't what most people would call springm. If you live outside of the "urban-ish" areas things are pretty muddy that time of year especially the dirt roads so you want a mud room to remove your shoes in.

This is not a term I've heard elsewhere.

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Flex » 25 Jul 2017, 10:36pm

Yeah, I use mud room/mud season.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Dr. Medulla » 26 Jul 2017, 6:10am

Preliminary results: Kory's the weirdo.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by JennyB » 26 Jul 2017, 10:08am

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Jul 2017, 7:21pm
Question for non-Canadians: Do you use the term mud room for the part of the house where you take off your shoes, hang up your coats, etc? I'm mildly curious whether this is a fairly common term.
Yes. We actually have one. It's the main reason I wanted our house.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by eumaas » 26 Jul 2017, 10:25am

I've heard the term used, but we never used it in Virginia. Not sure about Maine. Never heard it there but it may be in use.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Dr. Medulla » 26 Jul 2017, 10:41am

I was curious about Southerners given a slightly awkward experience we had in NC. In Saskatchewan (if not Canada; I've never asked others), when you go to someone's home, it's proper to take your shoes off. I'm guessing it's related to our agricultural background and not tracking dirt and shit into the home. B and I assumed that was universal protocol, but when our class was invited over to a prof's home, she and I took off our shoes and one of our friends said, "Well, you're making yourself at home." Completely opposite protocol, we found out—unless told otherwise, keep your shoes on. Given all that, I wondered whether Southerners would use the term mud room.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by JennyB » 26 Jul 2017, 11:11am

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 10:41am
I was curious about Southerners given a slightly awkward experience we had in NC. In Saskatchewan (if not Canada; I've never asked others), when you go to someone's home, it's proper to take your shoes off. I'm guessing it's related to our agricultural background and not tracking dirt and shit into the home. B and I assumed that was universal protocol, but when our class was invited over to a prof's home, she and I took off our shoes and one of our friends said, "Well, you're making yourself at home." Completely opposite protocol, we found out—unless told otherwise, keep your shoes on. Given all that, I wondered whether Southerners would use the term mud room.
I hate feet, so I would prefer that people keep their shoes ON. Feet are the worst.
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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by Dr. Medulla » 26 Jul 2017, 11:25am

JennyB wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 11:11am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 10:41am
I was curious about Southerners given a slightly awkward experience we had in NC. In Saskatchewan (if not Canada; I've never asked others), when you go to someone's home, it's proper to take your shoes off. I'm guessing it's related to our agricultural background and not tracking dirt and shit into the home. B and I assumed that was universal protocol, but when our class was invited over to a prof's home, she and I took off our shoes and one of our friends said, "Well, you're making yourself at home." Completely opposite protocol, we found out—unless told otherwise, keep your shoes on. Given all that, I wondered whether Southerners would use the term mud room.
I hate feet, so I would prefer that people keep their shoes ON. Feet are the worst.
What about socks? If you're not wearing socks, yeah, you should keep your shoes on, but socks are preferable to shoes that have been outside.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by eumaas » 26 Jul 2017, 12:01pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 10:41am
I was curious about Southerners given a slightly awkward experience we had in NC. In Saskatchewan (if not Canada; I've never asked others), when you go to someone's home, it's proper to take your shoes off. I'm guessing it's related to our agricultural background and not tracking dirt and shit into the home. B and I assumed that was universal protocol, but when our class was invited over to a prof's home, she and I took off our shoes and one of our friends said, "Well, you're making yourself at home." Completely opposite protocol, we found out—unless told otherwise, keep your shoes on. Given all that, I wondered whether Southerners would use the term mud room.
Yeah, taking shoes off is a weird thing here. I'm uncomfortable in homes where I have to take off my shoes.
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: A Language Question For The Linguists

Post by JennyB » 26 Jul 2017, 12:11pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 11:25am
JennyB wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 11:11am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Jul 2017, 10:41am
I was curious about Southerners given a slightly awkward experience we had in NC. In Saskatchewan (if not Canada; I've never asked others), when you go to someone's home, it's proper to take your shoes off. I'm guessing it's related to our agricultural background and not tracking dirt and shit into the home. B and I assumed that was universal protocol, but when our class was invited over to a prof's home, she and I took off our shoes and one of our friends said, "Well, you're making yourself at home." Completely opposite protocol, we found out—unless told otherwise, keep your shoes on. Given all that, I wondered whether Southerners would use the term mud room.
I hate feet, so I would prefer that people keep their shoes ON. Feet are the worst.
What about socks? If you're not wearing socks, yeah, you should keep your shoes on, but socks are preferable to shoes that have been outside.
As long as there are no holes with creepy toes sticking out, socks are fine.
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