Star Trek

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Dr. Medulla
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Dr. Medulla » 20 Oct 2017, 8:41pm

Kory wrote:
20 Oct 2017, 8:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
20 Oct 2017, 7:22pm
Episodic vs serial storytelling considered: https://io9.gizmodo.com/serialized-tele ... 1819660859

My initial reaction is to wonder whether extreme serialization actually is a thing. I don't watch GoT or Walking Dead, but are they that problematic or normal in terms of these shows?
I don't watch those two either but I did watch Breaking Bad, and thought it was great. The problem with episodic television is that it becomes formulaic, or (as one of the commenters pointed out), nothing has any meaning because you're back at square one by the next episode. Serialization is what TV should be doing—it's the pinnacle of the form. I think we can all agree that the best show that existed before the "Golden Age" of television is Twin Peaks—a serial. BOOM.

I think the only thing that really benefits from episodic storytelling at this point is animated shows. Unless I'm so tired right now that I'm forgetting some excellent example.
Episodic needn't be bad or inferior. Or, put another way, character growth isn't vital to entertaining storytelling. If you set up characters as archetypes, episodic storytelling makes sense because you don't need/want characters to grow. Stories are bascially playpens for those characters to work with. But if the characters are flawed, then I think you need something more serialized, where their growth or collapse is bound up in the narrative. The criticism of nothing having meaning only works with flawed characters; with archetypes, the meaning is fully with us and how we interpret how they wrestled with a dilemma.

Cynically, I'd say the tv biz prefers serial because it wants people hooked, that missing an episode might mean missing a crucial part of the narrative, so the mouse chases the cheese. But it's a bit of a gamble—viewers are either in or out. Episodic allows a more casual viewership.
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Kory
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Kory » 21 Oct 2017, 9:51pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
20 Oct 2017, 8:41pm
Kory wrote:
20 Oct 2017, 8:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
20 Oct 2017, 7:22pm
Episodic vs serial storytelling considered: https://io9.gizmodo.com/serialized-tele ... 1819660859

My initial reaction is to wonder whether extreme serialization actually is a thing. I don't watch GoT or Walking Dead, but are they that problematic or normal in terms of these shows?
I don't watch those two either but I did watch Breaking Bad, and thought it was great. The problem with episodic television is that it becomes formulaic, or (as one of the commenters pointed out), nothing has any meaning because you're back at square one by the next episode. Serialization is what TV should be doing—it's the pinnacle of the form. I think we can all agree that the best show that existed before the "Golden Age" of television is Twin Peaks—a serial. BOOM.

I think the only thing that really benefits from episodic storytelling at this point is animated shows. Unless I'm so tired right now that I'm forgetting some excellent example.
Episodic needn't be bad or inferior. Or, put another way, character growth isn't vital to entertaining storytelling. If you set up characters as archetypes, episodic storytelling makes sense because you don't need/want characters to grow. Stories are bascially playpens for those characters to work with. But if the characters are flawed, then I think you need something more serialized, where their growth or collapse is bound up in the narrative. The criticism of nothing having meaning only works with flawed characters; with archetypes, the meaning is fully with us and how we interpret how they wrestled with a dilemma.

Cynically, I'd say the tv biz prefers serial because it wants people hooked, that missing an episode might mean missing a crucial part of the narrative, so the mouse chases the cheese. But it's a bit of a gamble—viewers are either in or out. Episodic allows a more casual viewership.
Yeah, I agree. I was a little shamerd yesterday and feeling goofy. I regret it now because I don't agree with last night's KP. However, I do think the potential for lazy writing is higher with episodic TV.
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St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
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Dr. Medulla
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Dr. Medulla » 23 Oct 2017, 4:31pm

https://io9.gizmodo.com/star-trek-disco ... 1819758511
I tend to agree that one notable problem with ST:D, and one that is unnecessary, is that it's a prequel and so it's constantly ramming up against TOS and raising unwanted questions about continuity and technology and all that. Thus far, so much of it could be set after Voyager without major changes and make the technology and all seem a sensible evolution.

I'm still finding the show really dark, visually and thematically, without much of a way out. I haven't found any character that I really give a shit about, including Micheal. (Plus, if we have to endure Klingon language with English subtitles, why should we accept that Vulcans speak English? If you're going to emphasize alien foreignness and use subtitles, be consistent.)
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Dr. Medulla
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Dr. Medulla » 26 Oct 2017, 4:28pm

"The Magnificent Ferengi" is on. That's the one with Iggy Pop as a Vorta. It's slight and inconsequential, but pretty funny. Iggy's deadpan delivery of his lines are perfect.
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Flex
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Flex » 26 Oct 2017, 11:05pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Oct 2017, 4:28pm
"The Magnificent Ferengi" is on. That's the one with Iggy Pop as a Vorta. It's slight and inconsequential, but pretty funny. Iggy's deadpan delivery of his lines are perfect.
Love that one.
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