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Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 18 Oct 2017, 5:30pm
by Dr. Medulla
Kory wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 5:10pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:45pm
Mimi wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:32pm
Good on you. Diet is 90% of it, so *shakes finger* eat right, young man. What really helped me is developing an attitude of: reach for a green vegetable first, organic if possible. Except today. Today I'm eating like shit.
My problem is that I don't really like food. Or love it the way other people seem to. I have preferences, but I'm pretty ho-hum when you get right down to it. I could eat soup for a month straight without being bothered. My lunch is some yogurt. At least once a week I just have a grilled cheese sandwich for supper. It's simple, tastes okay, and it keeps alive until morning. My guess is that I have no passion for food because my mother was a horrible cook when I was a kid, so I was never all that eager for meals. Oh well, there are worse vices.
My mom was a fairly drab cook as well—how do you explain my international tastes?
Sautéed maggots and raw pine cones is international?

(I can't exaggerate how blah my mother's cooking was, tho I don't know how much blame goes to her. My father insisted on bland food. Boiled vegetables, unseasoned meat. Any crazy spices were salt and pepper on the kitchen table. Moving in with B taught me that all kinds of food could, y'know, excite the taste buds.)

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
by Silent Majority
I can surf the web to my heart's content at work now. When I was 15, before we even got the internet at home, this would have blown my mind. Dad used to take me to the internet cafe and I'd read pages about Karloff and Lugosi, go on Strummernews, and feel connected. Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 6:22am
by Dr. Medulla
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.
Back in the 90s, we were promised—assured—something much more edenic. I'm not sure even the naysayers predicted the morass of bigotry and outright fascism that has been encouraged and strengthened.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 6:29am
by Silent Majority
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.
Back in the 90s, we were promised—assured—something much more edenic. I'm not sure even the naysayers predicted the morass of bigotry and outright fascism that has been encouraged and strengthened.
America OnLine: Rascism but much faster

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 6:41am
by Dr. Medulla
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:29am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.
Back in the 90s, we were promised—assured—something much more edenic. I'm not sure even the naysayers predicted the morass of bigotry and outright fascism that has been encouraged and strengthened.
America OnLine: Rascism but much faster
You've got mail from your bigot uncle.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 9:02am
by Mimi
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
I can surf the web to my heart's content at work now. When I was 15, before we even got the internet at home, this would have blown my mind. Dad used to take me to the internet cafe and I'd read pages about Karloff and Lugosi, go on Strummernews, and feel connected. Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.
Same. I've been pulling back from it for the past year. Maybe it's the political climate or the constant rage, but I'm bored with it, exhausted, too.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 10:19am
by Silent Majority
Mimi wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 9:02am
Silent Majority wrote:
19 Oct 2017, 6:10am
I can surf the web to my heart's content at work now. When I was 15, before we even got the internet at home, this would have blown my mind. Dad used to take me to the internet cafe and I'd read pages about Karloff and Lugosi, go on Strummernews, and feel connected. Now I just kind of think the web's terrible.
Same. I've been pulling back from it for the past year. Maybe it's the political climate or the constant rage, but I'm bored with it, exhausted, too.
All of this, yeah. I'm just happier away from it.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 19 Oct 2017, 11:32am
by tepista
Image

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
by Dr. Medulla
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
by Wolter
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 6:22am
by Dr. Medulla
Wolter wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.
I took a quick peak at a fill-a-pix puzzle. Seems more complex than a nonogram, but, definitely, a similar concept.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 2:28pm
by 101Walterton
Dr. Medulla wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Wolter wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.
I took a quick peak at a fill-a-pix puzzle. Seems more complex than a nonogram, but, definitely, a similar concept.
Yes but do you keep your clothes on?

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 2:36pm
by Marky Dread
101Walterton wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 2:28pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Wolter wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.
I took a quick peak at a fill-a-pix puzzle. Seems more complex than a nonogram, but, definitely, a similar concept.
Yes but do you keep your clothes on?
Fuck me you guys need to get out more.

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 2:52pm
by Dr. Medulla
101Walterton wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 2:28pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Wolter wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.
I took a quick peak at a fill-a-pix puzzle. Seems more complex than a nonogram, but, definitely, a similar concept.
Yes but do you keep your clothes on?
Um, yes? (I'm missing a joke here, aren't I?)

Re: Return of the Mighty Observations Thread

Posted: 24 Oct 2017, 3:03pm
by Marky Dread
Dr. Medulla wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 2:52pm
101Walterton wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 2:28pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
24 Oct 2017, 6:22am
Wolter wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 10:49pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
23 Oct 2017, 8:52pm
Anyone here do nonogram puzzles? Since getting an iPad app of them, I've become seriously addicted, doing at least a dozen a day. It's about solving the location of marked off squares on a grid where your only clue is how many of those squares are in each row and column (Google it). Similar in concept to Sudoku in that solving smaller aspects of the puzzle adds information, but the whole experience is very relaxing and satisfying as the solution emerges.
I’ve done very similar puzzles, mostly apps from Conceptis like Fill-a-pix and pic-a-pix. And yeah. Very addictive.
I took a quick peak at a fill-a-pix puzzle. Seems more complex than a nonogram, but, definitely, a similar concept.
Yes but do you keep your clothes on?
Um, yes? (I'm missing a joke here, aren't I?)
It's bound to involve sheep so don't ask.