The Shoegazing Thread

General music discussion.
Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm

Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 18 Sep 2017, 2:08pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm
The Asian shoegaze movement: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... -over-asia
Huh, I'll have to take a look. Have you listened to any of them yet?

In other news, I'm now checking out Ringo Deathstarr because they keep popping up in my feed. I don't like the name much but they have a unique-ish take on the style.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 18 Sep 2017, 2:15pm

Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:08pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm
The Asian shoegaze movement: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... -over-asia
Huh, I'll have to take a look. Have you listened to any of them yet?

In other news, I'm now checking out Ringo Deathstarr because they keep popping up in my feed. I don't like the name much but they have a unique-ish take on the style.
No, I haven't sampled any yet. I've listened to a bit of RD in the past. Way too hipster a band name, but what I heard was decent enough (but not memorable either).
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 18 Sep 2017, 2:33pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:15pm
Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:08pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm
The Asian shoegaze movement: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... -over-asia
Huh, I'll have to take a look. Have you listened to any of them yet?

In other news, I'm now checking out Ringo Deathstarr because they keep popping up in my feed. I don't like the name much but they have a unique-ish take on the style.
No, I haven't sampled any yet. I've listened to a bit of RD in the past. Way too hipster a band name, but what I heard was decent enough (but not memorable either).
Past 1993, what in this genre really is, though?
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
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Atheistic Epileptic
Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
Location: Nerdo Crombezia
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 18 Sep 2017, 2:50pm

Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:33pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:15pm
Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:08pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm
The Asian shoegaze movement: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... -over-asia
Huh, I'll have to take a look. Have you listened to any of them yet?

In other news, I'm now checking out Ringo Deathstarr because they keep popping up in my feed. I don't like the name much but they have a unique-ish take on the style.
No, I haven't sampled any yet. I've listened to a bit of RD in the past. Way too hipster a band name, but what I heard was decent enough (but not memorable either).
Past 1993, what in this genre really is, though?
Fair point. It's a genre very much rooted in working similar terrain.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Posts: 7338
Joined: 17 Jun 2008, 1:42pm
Location: In the Discosphere

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 19 Sep 2017, 1:30pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:50pm
Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:33pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:15pm
Kory wrote:
18 Sep 2017, 2:08pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 4:13pm
The Asian shoegaze movement: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... -over-asia
Huh, I'll have to take a look. Have you listened to any of them yet?

In other news, I'm now checking out Ringo Deathstarr because they keep popping up in my feed. I don't like the name much but they have a unique-ish take on the style.
No, I haven't sampled any yet. I've listened to a bit of RD in the past. Way too hipster a band name, but what I heard was decent enough (but not memorable either).
Past 1993, what in this genre really is, though?
Fair point. It's a genre very much rooted in working similar terrain.
The more that I discover, the more it seems the bands that stand out to me have something subtly unique about them, but they're all working from the same template. No Joy has better songwriting than most, Nothing is more muscular, Ringo Deathstarr is more kinetic. I think they're worth listening to based on those small differences, but the genre seems to be less forgiving than most when it comes to experimentation. I liked Soundpool's last album a lot because they were able to fuse it with dance music. I'd like to see more adventurous bands, but a lot of them seem to think that they can't stray beyond a certain boundary. For this reason I get more excited about dream pop than shoegaze. It seems like it allows for a lot more diversity.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
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Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm

What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Joined: 17 Jun 2008, 1:42pm
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm
What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
User avatar
Atheistic Epileptic
Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
Location: Nerdo Crombezia
Contact:

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm

Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm
What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Posts: 7338
Joined: 17 Jun 2008, 1:42pm
Location: In the Discosphere

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 19 Sep 2017, 3:02pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm
What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
I like bands that don't give a toss what their fans want. I guess maybe they owe something to the fans that got them where they are, but the best way to repay that is to continue a line of adventurousness that the original fans presumably found enticing in the first place.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
User avatar
Atheistic Epileptic
Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
Location: Nerdo Crombezia
Contact:

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 19 Sep 2017, 3:15pm

Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:02pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm
What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
I like bands that don't give a toss what their fans want. I guess maybe they owe something to the fans that got them where they are, but the best way to repay that is to continue a line of adventurousness that the original fans presumably found enticing in the first place.
Yeah, even if I don't care for a direction that a band I dig goes, if it's because that's where they're drawn, that's cool. I wasn't thrilled with EBTG's turn to club music—it's not awful, but it didn't play to their strengths—but that was where they were interested, so good on them. Plus, they finally sold well.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
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Posts: 7338
Joined: 17 Jun 2008, 1:42pm
Location: In the Discosphere

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 19 Sep 2017, 3:25pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:15pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:02pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 1:45pm
What's amusing is that shoegaze is an updated form of psychedelic rock, which was all about expanding the sonic experience, not being restrictive.
Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
I like bands that don't give a toss what their fans want. I guess maybe they owe something to the fans that got them where they are, but the best way to repay that is to continue a line of adventurousness that the original fans presumably found enticing in the first place.
Yeah, even if I don't care for a direction that a band I dig goes, if it's because that's where they're drawn, that's cool. I wasn't thrilled with EBTG's turn to club music—it's not awful, but it didn't play to their strengths—but that was where they were interested, so good on them. Plus, they finally sold well.
I suppose, since this is almost a Clash board, Sandinista! is a good example too.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
User avatar
Atheistic Epileptic
Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
Location: Nerdo Crombezia
Contact:

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 19 Sep 2017, 3:31pm

Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:15pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:02pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:40pm


Echoes of the punk movement...what we need is post-gaze.
Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
I like bands that don't give a toss what their fans want. I guess maybe they owe something to the fans that got them where they are, but the best way to repay that is to continue a line of adventurousness that the original fans presumably found enticing in the first place.
Yeah, even if I don't care for a direction that a band I dig goes, if it's because that's where they're drawn, that's cool. I wasn't thrilled with EBTG's turn to club music—it's not awful, but it didn't play to their strengths—but that was where they were interested, so good on them. Plus, they finally sold well.
I suppose, since this is almost a Clash board, Sandinista! is a good example too.
Yeah! It's a crazy mess, but I think we here all appreciate it because they followed their muse or whatever, irrespective of the results.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

Kory
User avatar
Unknown Immortal
Posts: 7338
Joined: 17 Jun 2008, 1:42pm
Location: In the Discosphere

Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Kory » 19 Sep 2017, 4:28pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:31pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:15pm
Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 3:02pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 2:53pm


Here's my theory on scenes/subcultures: Left to the artists, it will remain fluid, diverse, experimental. It's the fans that dictate the parameters, fashions, and behaviours (more so than record companies). Scenes start out quite open and slowly funnel to a distinct sound that becomes restrictive and leads to splitters into new scenes. Hardcore fans are crucial for building momentum, but they also choke off creative growth. Sarah Thornton's excellent book Club Cultures looks at rave culture in the 90s as an endless cycle of elitism—a scene grows until it becomes too popular and the "wrong fans" (latecomers) lay claim and the originals go off looking for something else—but I think that elitist and possessive quality of serious fans also has an effect on the artistic expression of the musicians. The best way for a band to remain open to experiment is to not be tied to a scene.
I like bands that don't give a toss what their fans want. I guess maybe they owe something to the fans that got them where they are, but the best way to repay that is to continue a line of adventurousness that the original fans presumably found enticing in the first place.
Yeah, even if I don't care for a direction that a band I dig goes, if it's because that's where they're drawn, that's cool. I wasn't thrilled with EBTG's turn to club music—it's not awful, but it didn't play to their strengths—but that was where they were interested, so good on them. Plus, they finally sold well.
I suppose, since this is almost a Clash board, Sandinista! is a good example too.
Yeah! It's a crazy mess, but I think we here all appreciate it because they followed their muse or whatever, irrespective of the results.
I've mentioned this here before, but I'm way more likely to respect an artist if they have some kind of ambition, even if I don't care much for what came out of it. The bigger, the better, too. Really, what's the point if you're just going to repeat yourself?

However, the state of the music industry is such that being that creatively ambitious must be difficult when you also have to spend your time thinking about contracts, touring, and dealing with executives and tight deadlines. Nothing's black and white, I guess.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

Dr. Medulla
User avatar
Atheistic Epileptic
Posts: 71084
Joined: 15 Jun 2008, 2:00pm
Location: Nerdo Crombezia
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Re: The Shoegazing Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 19 Sep 2017, 4:40pm

Kory wrote:
19 Sep 2017, 4:28pm
However, the state of the music industry is such that being that creatively ambitious must be difficult when you also have to spend your time thinking about contracts, touring, and dealing with executives and tight deadlines. Nothing's black and white, I guess.
Production and distribution technology has liberated musicians from much of the need for record companies, all of which encourages being creative and faithful to oneself, but the cost is that even fewer artists can make enough money for the mythical rock star life now, let alone be fully independent musicians. Personally, I like that trade off, if for no other reason than the destruction of the record conglomerates would be a very good thing. But I'm also not a musician, so there is that.
Walrus birth doesn't make good breakfast conversation!

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