Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

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eumaas
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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 06 May 2010, 3:02pm

Billy Joel wrote:I'm gonna download some of his stuff just because of that anecdote. That is punk fucking rock.
Some of his music is actually tonal (has a key center), but the way he builds it makes it foreign and strange. I recommend checking out his solo soprano sax stuff, or maybe Time Lapse where he does overdubs as well as solo tracks.

From a technical angle, there is no better saxophonist. He rapidly alternates between the low, middle, high, and extremely high registers of the instrument--that in itself is incredibly hard because you have to change the shape of your oral cavity to voice certain notes... and he does all that while also circular breathing. He's a genius on the musical level too--he builds independent melody lines in each register that nevertheless interlock. It's sort of like trying to play all the parts of a complex fugue on one instrument simultaneously. It can take a while to hear what he's doing, but once you do it's pretty amazing.

His early work has some great goddamn screaming.
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 06 May 2010, 3:11pm

Time Lapse is interesting because he improvises with himself and gets more compositional. All his solo sop stuff can sound the same until you get acclimated (much like music from foreign cultures can seem to be all the same until you "unlock" it with your ears), but with Time Lapse you have that more traditionally compositional angle, so it could be an "in."

His work as a sideman is great too, and I think, oddly enough, it's there where you see his influence on John Butcher's solo music. His tenor playing and sideman stuff is more about developing sounds while the solo sop stuff is more about harmonic and melodic ideas (though there is plenty of sound playing there too).
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 08 May 2010, 12:41am

"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 08 May 2010, 12:49pm

"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 10 May 2010, 8:51pm

Interesting to hear the contrast between him just fucking around and what he sounds like when he gets down to it--same technique, but giving it focus makes an audible difference:
[youtube]
[/youtube]
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 10 May 2010, 11:51pm

Holy smoke!

http://inconstantsol.blogspot.com/2008/ ... ailey.html

Derek Bailey, Tony Oxley, and Gavin Bryars backing Lee Konitz in straightahead bop fashion. Well, relatively. Shitty recording, but where else are you going to hear that?
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by Flex » 12 May 2010, 11:34pm

This was part of a docket of music I got the other day and I fucking love, love, LOVE this album:
Image
Good recommendation, eumaas.
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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by Flex » 13 May 2010, 12:29am

Here's a track from the Miles Away album I namechecked in the listening thread:

Each track is a tribute to a different artist, so each song has a bit of a unique flavor. I'll upload the one for Coltrane and Sanders sometime.

And here's a more straight-up hip-hop track from the producer, Madlib:

That video makes me grin.
Last edited by Flex on 26 Aug 2015, 11:28pm, edited 1 time in total.
"I live inside my own heart, Matt Damon." - Prince

Sous les pavés, la plage.

Pex Lives!

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 18 May 2010, 9:05am

RIP Hank Jones.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainmen ... 121844.stm

I think I'll fire up The Hawk Flies High.
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by Kory » 28 May 2010, 3:06am

Eums,

After you extolling the virtues of Soul Station so much, I went back (it's been a long time) to listen, and man, you were correct as hell. Wynton Kelly is on goddamn fire.
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 30 May 2010, 11:13pm

Rexroth on Ornette:
The best thing on this trip was the music of Ornette Coleman. This is the young man who, almost single-handed, has launched one of those periodic revolutions without which jazz would become a sport of musicologists. He is playing the Five Spot to jam-packed audiences every night, rain or shine, a large percentage of them other musicians. It is significant that the top-notchers, Coltrane, Mingus, the Adderly brothers, and the rest, all think he is terrific.

The second string, especially the perennial side men of the bop revolution, think he is a fake. The reason, of course, is that they have a vested interest in their own stale novelties and are terrified of being crowded at the trough. I was a little dubious myself, and recently asked John Lewis during a radio interview, “Is Coleman really good?” He answered simply and flatly, “Yes, he is just as good as they ever come.” If you know music — can read score or whatever — all you have to do is listen. This is jazz that uses every musical resource, dissonance, polyrhythm, twelve-tone scales, polytonality, special tone color effects — everything you can find and pull out of four musical instruments.

Coleman himself, as you may know, plays a plastic saxophone with a special fleshy tone color, and he makes it do tricks like Yma Sumac. He pushes it back and forth to the absolute limits of its range, it gulps and scoops and vibrates — Paul Whiteman would have given a lot of money to have had some of these effects in the concert version of “Oh, By Jingo,” but with Coleman it is never corny, because the end in view is an enriched musical experience, not a trick.

Modern jazz is mostly harmony-oriented, most numbers are really toccatas or chaconnes — “Theme and Variations.” Seldom do you get even the rather thin melodic and contrapuntal interest of the best Dixieland.

Ornette Coleman has restored melody to jazz. Even his new drummer, Blackwell, weaves a constantly varying percussion melody around the other instruments. Hayden’s bass is even more melodic, very seldom is it just pedaling, usually something is happening, vital elements are being built into the melodic structure. Besides, like all the others, he pulls all the color out of the instrument he can get. Midway in the first number I suddenly pricked up my ears and looked at his hands. He wasn’t using the conventional positions at all, but crawling up and down the long neck of the bass like a crab. The results were wonderful. I just hope he doesn’t get a permanent bursitis. People always ask, “What is that thing Don Cherry plays?” He tells them it is a Pakistani yeti whistle or some such tale. It is a triple-curled B-flat horn which must require a superhuman head of wind to blow, especially since he plays it with a flat, dry embouchure that makes it sound like imaginary music.

All this is just to let you know, not that I am “in the know,” but that contrary to what you might have heard, nobody in jazz knows better what he is about than these four men. Most important, it isn’t a lot of scrambled Boulez and Monteverdi. It is jazz, funkier far than jazz has been in a long time. You could not only dance to it, you could roll and bump to it. It is even unconsciously “folkloristic.” The whole group is from the Southwest, and behind them you can hear the old bygone banjos and tack pianos, and the first hard moans of country blues — you can even hear modern Texas dance bands, Johnny Ace and Lloyd Price. I have not spent such nights of pure musical joy and excitement since we used to get together at Farwell Taylor’s or Jack Bryant’s cellar joint and work out the first patterns of the new jazz that came at the end of the war. For years Ornette Coleman wandered up and down the Coast and nobody would hire him. If the Hawk or the Workshop doesn’t get him here soon, I’ll rent a hall myself.
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

eumaas
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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 31 May 2010, 6:21pm

Kory wrote:Eums,

After you extolling the virtues of Soul Station so much, I went back (it's been a long time) to listen, and man, you were correct as hell. Wynton Kelly is on goddamn fire.
Probably my favorite hard bop album.
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by Wolter » 11 Jun 2010, 12:13pm

Image
"There's something more honest, he believed, about traditional methods of mass starvation, labour camps, and machine gunning millions to death. Stalin was a vinyl guy who sneered at Truman converting everything to compact disc." - Thomas Jefferson

"But the gorilla thinks otherwise!"

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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by Kory » 11 Jun 2010, 12:39pm

Wolter wrote:Image
*chuckle*
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

eumaas
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Re: Satch's Late Night (The Jazz Thread)

Post by eumaas » 11 Jun 2010, 12:46pm

Wolter wrote:Image
:mrgreen:
"The only thing that really occurs to me that I can say on this is to point out how fascinating it is that the Hassan-i-Sabbah archetype keeps turning up over and over again ... He disappears up into the mountains and is never seen again. Believe me, he'll never be seen again. He'll live forever because of that."

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